Wellness Month

While wellness can be hard to quantify, we're predicting that awareness of the many facets of health – mental, physical and spiritual – and their effects on happiness and productivity will be a key business trend this year. We're looking at ways to help increase the health of humans and the health of businesses, as well as how people improving and expanding their abilities and attending to their wellness will help them reach their full potential in the workplace.

Wellness Month

Opinion

Idealog editor Elly Strang recently spoke at the Magazine Publishers Association conference about the importance of wellbeing in the workplace, and the key takeaways from Wellness Month. She shares why it shouldn't be thought of as a luxury nice-to-have, like yoga classes, as research is showing it impacts on your bottom line, as well as some tips on how to address it in the workplace.

Wellbeing Month

After an eventful week, the government finally debuted what The New York Times has called 'New Zealand's next liberal milestone': the 2019 Wellbeing Budget, the first of its kind where spending is guided by what best encourages the wellbeing of the country's citizens, rather than just economic prosperity. We reached out to a range of industry players and asked them what the most important issue the budget tackled was, as well as where there was room for improvement. Here's what The Icehouse's Andy Hamilton, The Ground Breaking Podcast's Eli Smit, Swaytech's Bob Pinchin, education futurist Claire Amos, The Workshop's Dr Jess Berentson-Shaw and more had to say.

Wellbeing Month

When the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction report was released in December last year, it painted a grim picture. “New Zealand is experiencing a rising tide of mental distress and addiction,” it said. “The cost of poor mental wellbeing and addiction is high. It is a high cost to individuals, families and whānau, businesses and organisations, communities, government and the country as a whole.” While the spotlight has been shone on specific demographics, one sector that is also toiling under pressure is our creative industries. We all know the squeeze of creative work well: late nights, long hours, client demands, unrealistic deadlines, impostor syndrome, self-criticism. This, coupled with the sensitive disposition creative people tend to have, often creates an environment where mental health issues can flourish. However, these people also have a talent for communicating ideas at a time when New Zealand has a base-level awareness of the problem, but not a deeper understanding or the tools to fix it. In part two of a series, Elly Strang talks to the new wave of creators are coming up with inspiring solutions to confront our mental health problem head on.

Wellbeing Month

When the Government Inquiry into Mental Health and Addiction report was released in December last year, it painted a grim picture. “New Zealand is experiencing a rising tide of mental distress and addiction,” it said. “The cost of poor mental wellbeing and addiction is high. It is a high cost to individuals, families and whānau, businesses and organisations, communities, government and the country as a whole.” While the spotlight has been shone on specific demographics, one sector that is also toiling under pressure is our creative industries. We all know the squeeze of creative work well: late nights, long hours, client demands, unrealistic deadlines, impostor syndrome, self-criticism. This, coupled with the sensitive disposition creative people tend to have, often creates an environment where mental health issues can flourish. In part one of a series, Elly Strang looks at the scale of the mental health problem in New Zealand's creative industries.

Idealog + krunch.co

Tomek Bielanski, senior analytics consultant at krunch.co, has spent the last two years trying to track, crunch and analyse all the real-time data about himself that he can, in the name of wellness. What has he learned?

Wellbeing Month

Much of our and our planet’s unwellness stems from living in a political, economic and societal framework that hasn’t factored human beings, their needs and their rights into it, cultural strategist at TRA Antonia Mann says. She examines how we can shift this 'othering' of wellness into something that's holistic and integrated into our societies, businesses and economy.

Wellbeing Month

There’s a movement afoot globally to create more companies that balance purpose with profit and view business as a force for good. Called Certified B Corporations, companies that meet the highest standards of social and environmental performance, public transparency and legal accountability can become certified. As of April, Sharesies investment platform was the first financial company nationally to qualify for the B Corp certification, joining just 22 other New Zealand B Corp certified businesses. CEO Brooke Roberts talks us through the process, and the benefits for businesses in becoming certified.

Opinion

There may be good reason to be concerned about our young entrepreneurs. Millennials and Generation Z have been labelled generation burn-out, generation snowflake and described as narcissistic, entitled, tech-dependent and fragile. They’re also oversaturated with headlines about the raft of issues like climate change they have to tackle, plus concerns about the impact of technology and social media on their mental health. Jennifer Young explores possible reasons why the younger generation is so anxious, as well as what young founders can do to avoid burn-out.

Wellbeing Month

In 2019, companies are more focused than ever on the health and happiness of their staff, as wellbeing becomes increasingly seen as a key indicator of success along economic value by governments – including our very own – and organisations across the world. This is because while the corporate world has long seen the bottom line as the be all and end all, companies are increasingly taking a more holistic view and recognising that looking after the wellbeing of their people will in turn make their bottom line healthier, too. We reached out to the people in charge of wellbeing policies at some of New Zealand's top companies and asked what they're focused on for this year and why. Here's what FCB, Isthmus, RUSH, Southern Cross, Xero and Trade Me responded.

Wellbeing Month

2019 will be a year in which cultural, environmental and social factors will be drawn on to measure success. It is recognition that people, and their communities, and their health, matter. SenateSHJ general manager Raphael Hilbron says the bottom line can no longer be the only way an organisation’s progress is assessed and now, it will be judged on its broader contribution to society, and the health and happiness of its staff. Here's a breakdown of the five wellbeing trends he believes will shape the next 12 months, and how companies can start thinking about them.

Elevator Pitch, brought to you by Flick

We gave Angus Brown a little longer than an elevator ride to pitch Ārepa, a caffeine-free mental clarity drink that has ingredients derived from New Zealand-sourced pine and blackcurrants.

Wellbeing Month

When the Christchurch attacks unfolded earlier this year, prime minister Jacinda Ardern was praised around the world for her empathetic leadership style. But how does this same style of leadership apply to business leaders? Leadership expert and keynote speaker ​Daniel Murray discusses how businesses can discover the concept of strategic empathy, and in turn, realign their commercial objectives and develop a culture that contributes to a more inclusive world.

Wellbeing Month

This month, Idealog has chosen to spotlight the growing number of businesses and organisations who reside in the caverns of Aotearoa’s wellness industry – or the new culture of self-love that has brewed into the broths of business. It poses as a potential cure to mental health, the guide to a purposeful life, a lover to nature, yet is undeniably a lucrative money-making machine. The Global Wellness Institute reported that the wellness market grew from $3.7 trillion in 2015 to $4.2 trillion in 2017 — growing at nearly twice the rate of the global economy (3.6 percent annually). It also generates 5.3 percent of global economic output. Previously not considered a legible term, Wellness is now a culturally shared phenomenon, canvassed across the media and advertising world, while Global Wellness Day is now celebrated in more than 100 countries at 5000 different locations. So, where did this movement come from, and what are the opportunities, and the pitfalls for New Zealand?

Wellbeing Month

Cities are systems in which the people are meant to thrive, but Isthmus creative director David Irwin says the design of them is instead accentuating many of the human ailments, such as stress, anxiety and depression. Here, he outlines how using a human-centric approach in urban design can support the needs of a modern world.

Idealog + Wolf and Fox

New year, new me? Sometimes it's hard to carve out healthy habits for ourselves, particularly when it comes to the realm of business, where the work/life balance can get lost. Toss Grumley breaks down the habits of successful people and how they manage their wellbeing.

Wellbeing Month

In New Zealand, we often pride ourselves for being leaders in workplace happiness and having a cruisy, laid back office culture. For the most part our companies are relaxed, our work days are flexible, and our ties can be casually tossed aside on a Friday. Yet some international big players such as Fit-Bit, Airbnb, Google and Twitter go to extreme lengths to make sure their employees are taken care of. We take a look at some the best examples of wellness policies from around the globe.

Elevator Pitch, brought to you by Flick

We gave Rich Tangney a little longer than an elevator ride to pitch Edison, a newly launched personalised healthcare service based in Auckland that includes detailed genetic profiling, 3D body imaging and even wearable tech to track their patients’ health and wellbeing – and hopefully, prolong their life span.

Optimising the workplace

A new-age job title, 'chief happiness officer', is being smeared across business portfolios like lashings of margarine across soft focaccia bread. It joins a list of other modern roles found in the valleys of our tech industry, such as ‘chief evangelists’, ‘technology unicorns’, and ‘PR wonderboys’. But while at first the role of a chief happiness officer may smell of self promotion, pricey avocados and unfettered positivity, it seems the value goes deeper than a tacky title, as it may signify real change in workplace culture and unlock productivity levels. One business who believes this is Optimal Workshop, a large user experience design company based in Wellington New Zealand, who has employed a person who reportedly makes daily juices for its staff of 49. We ask its CEO Andrew Mayfield the value in this newly established role, plus chat to its ex ‘chief happiness engineer’ turned ‘people experience officer’, Alex Doggett, on what she does.